You’ve had your chips

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Chips, chips and more chips. I really love a bag of chip shop chips. After her stroke a couple of years ago Mary must avoid fatty food, so I don’t suggest that we go out for chips. But when Mary goes to visit her dad and I have a carer for the day my first thought is ‘chips’. Well maybe it’s my second thought after getting ready in the morning.

There are two places locally we go to eat our chips. The Quaker garden, a little quiet garden behind the Quaker meeting house, off Wellington High Street and Wellington Park. Often, we will eat chips at the Quaker garden and then carry onto the park. That way the chips stay hot as the chip shop is near the garden.

Wellington park, in case you’ve never visited, is a great place for a wheelchair. Getting there is not so easy. Wellington High St is an obstacle course and whether you take the narrow alley by Lloyds bank or the car park it’s a bumpy ride. Going across the path by the football field and cricket club is like a potholing trip. That is if you are trying to avoid potholes. There are some places where that’s impossible and the articulating suspension on my wheelchair gets a good workout. The tiny car park opposite Wellington Park is best to avoid at school arriving and leaving times. It’s not big enough for all the cars that try to squeeze in and it’s really a case of taking your life in your hands when weaving through the cars.

Once you enter Wellington park you feel you have stepped back in time. Of all the parks I have visited it is one of the prettiest. It’s also one of the best used by the greatest age range. There’s a family feel about the park. Some parks feel like spaces for the young or old, Wellington park feels like a place for all. The borders, though a bit of a blast from the past, are beautiful and well kept. There are winding paths, surprises around most corners. A bandstand that has live music for three months every summer and many events over the year. There is also a large and beautiful pond with a Chinese bridge at one end next to a waterfall.

There are trees to look at and even climb, a classic fountain and a fun and almost invisible feature, a ha-ha. If you don’t know what that is, then think invisible fencing. A drop off in the grass to give you an unimpeded view from park to countryside. In these days of health and safety gone mad, it’s survived without fencing.

The best and most wonderful things about Wellington park for me are that it has new tarmac paths, they are super smooth and I can operate my own wheelchair in the park. It’s quiet enough at the times we go to not risk the safety of others.

There is an old fashioned four-sided covered seating hut. One wet day I was visiting the park with a carer and we decided to shelter there. The lowest part of the shelter still had a 2” step up to it. I positioned my wheelchair and powered up it, the wheelchair lurched up and the front two of the six wheels flew in the air, the whole chair seemed to fly. It didn’t really, it just felt that way. With a bang the front wheels hit, and the chair stopped about an inch before the seat. I hadn’t noticed what a white complexion that particular carer had before that moment, nor did their complexion seem as white later on.

The other really nice feature of the park is a beautiful house built around 1900 that is still lived in by the park keeper and family. I have seen a glimpse inside through the front door and I hear the inside is really lovely.

Mary and I go regularly to Wellington park and I go there when I can with my carers. It’s a little haven of peace in the middle of Wellington.

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Music at Wellington Park

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